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Monthly Archives: August 2008

Enigma 7 = SEVEN LIVES MANY FACES will be released on 19th September 2008 – These are the latest words from EMI Germany / Enigma Management. The BRAND NEW Official Enigma web page http://www.Enigmaspace.com has given the signed up fans of the web page some clues that have to be decoded on the Enigma machine….The latest clues gave fans some hidden information from the new album…The ENIGMA Code Track listing of the forthcoming album;
DISC 1
01 – Encounters
02 – Seven Lives
03 – Touchness
04 – The Same Parents
05 – Fata Morgana
06 – Hell’s Heaven
07 – La Puerta del Cielo
08 – Distorted Love
09 – Je T’aime Till My Dying Day
10 – Déjà Vu
11 – Between Generations
12 – The Language of Sound

Disk 2 (Additional Tracks – Special Edition):
01. Superficial
02. We Are Nature
03. Downtown Silence
04. Sunrise
05. The Language Of Sound (Slow Edit)

The musical project ENIGMA leaves for a gigantic, infinite NEW WORLD. Seventh chapter will expand the current sound catalogue with a totally new one, creating an Omnicultural wave all around!! Register at http://www.EnigmaSpace.com, and all registered users will take part in a drawing for the exclusive album signed by Michael Cretu; the new ENIGMA album “SEVEN LIVES MANY FACES”.

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Rihanna’s “Disturbia” puts an end to the seven-week run at No. 1 by Katy Perry’s “I Kissed a Girl” on the Billboard Hot 100, rising 3-1 after selling 148,000 downloads, according to Nielsen SoundScan. It’s Rihanna’s fourth chart-topper here, tying her with Beyonce and Mariah Carey for the most by a female artist this decade.

Chris Brown’s “Forever” holds at No. 2, while “I Kissed a Girl” slides to No. 3. Another Rihanna song, “Take a Bow,” remains at No. 4, followed by M.I.A.’s “Paper Planes,” which jumps from No. 16 to a career-best No. 5 as the chart’s top digital gainer. The track, which sold more than 136,000 downloads, appears in the trailer for the new comedy “Pineapple Express.”

Coldplay’s “Viva La Vida” slips 5-6, Kardinal Offishall’s “Dangerous” featuring Akon holds at No. 7 and Lil Wayne’s “A Milli” falls 6-8. Rounding out the top 10, the Jonas Brothers’ ‘Burnin’ Up” rises 11-9, and Ne-Yo’s “Closer” stays at No. 10.

The chart’s top debut comes from another Jonas Brothers song with the title track to their new album, “A Little Bit Longer.” The track starts at No. 11 with 131,000 downloads; the album of the same name is a lock to debut next week at No. 1 on The Billboard 200. Also new is rapper the Game’s “My Life” featuring Lil Wayne at No. 21.

On Hot R&B/Hip-Hop Songs, “A Milli” dethrones Keyshia Cole’s long-running No. 1, “Heaven Sent.” Ludacris’ “What Them Girls Like” featuring Chris Brown and Sean Garrett is the top debut at No. 73.

Meanwhile, Taylor Swift scores her second No. 1 on Hot Country Songs as “Should’ve Said No” rockets 5-1. With the Foo Fighters in charge of the Modern Rock chart for a 4th week with “Let It Die,” Shinedown’s “Devour” ends the 14-week reign of Disturbed’s “Inside the Fire” on Mainstream Rock.

-GGG-

Fedora 9 now lets you create a bootable Linux distribution on a flash drive with persistence. In other words, you can not only boot any PC that will accept USB drive booting into Linux, you can even boot into your own personal desktop. Now, that can be useful.

Perhaps the easiest way to set up your own Fedora desktop on a stick is to use, believe it or not, liveusb-creator on Windows. This program gives you a straightforward GUI for creating Fedora desktop sticks. There is also a version of the program for Linux, but it’s still in beta.

Of course, you can also install the Fedora stick desktop with command-line instructions. I tried both ways, and while the Windows application is mindlessly simple, using the manual way on Linux isn’t going to task anyone with any Linux experience.

Either way you do it, you have the option of installing Fedora as a non-destructive upgrade, so if you already have files on a USB drive you can keep them while still turning the stick into a bootable drive. In practice, however, I found that I got better results by zapping the stick’s files and reformatting it. After all, it is just a USB drive. As far as I’m concerned, they’re meant for temporary storage.

I also found, although Red Hat staffers told me that you can deploy Fedora on USB sticks with as little as 64MB of storage, you really don’t want to do it with drives that hold less than 512MB. Officially, Fedora recommends that you use 1GB or larger USB drives.

The USB stick needs to be formatted in FAT-16 or -32 or the ext2 or ext3 filesystems. Most drives arrive preformatted in Windows’ FAT-32.

There’s a long list of tasks to keep in mind when creating a Fedora USB stick, including making a USB drive bootable and setting a master boot record. I ran into a problem that wasn’t covered though. I discovered that, for me at least, trying to create Fedora desktops on smaller USB drives or with older systems with USB 1.1 interfaces didn’t work. When I tried, the installation either failed or I ended up with a stick that would boot but ran as slowly as if it had one foot in a bear-trap. Once I moved to good-sized drives and PCs with USB 2.0 ports, creating the Fedora desktops went off without a hitch.

I also found that it was almost impossible to boot and run the stick-based Fedora on old PCs with USB 1.1 ports. On systems with 2.0 USB ports, however, everything went well. You should be aware though that, to quote the Fedora scripts page, “This may or may not work on your flash drive or your computer due to different BIOS settings and capabilities. I’ve tested several flash drives on several computers and the results were unexpected and surprising. Flash Drive A worked on Computer X but not on Computer Y. Flash Drive B didn’t work on Computer X but worked on Computer Y.” In my experience, using recent Lenovo, Dell, Gateway, and Hewlett-Packard PCs, the USB-stick-based version of Fedora ran flawlessly.

That said, you won’t mistake Fedora on USB for Fedora installed on a hard drive. The system is fast enough to be useful, but it’s not as fast as native Fedora on the same system. On the other hand, I found it to be much faster than using a live CD on the same PC. And, of course, you can save your settings and work on the USB stick.

You can also install additional programs on your portable desktop. To do this you simply use Fedora’s usual System -> Administration -> Add/Remove Programs from Fedora’s default GNOME 2.22 interface. Once you’ve installed them on your stick, you can use the new programs just as you would any other application. This really is a full, no-compromise version of Fedora. It just happens to live on a USB stick.

Once you’ve booted a system with it, you can also use all of the PC’s peripherals. To make full use of a system that normally boots Windows, you’ll want to be sure to install NTFS Config. With this program, you’ll be able to read and write to Windows systems’ native NTFS hard drives. Once installed, you’ll need to set up the drive configuration every time you’re working on a new Windows PC. It’s easy enough to do: pick NTFS Config from the System menu and set the hard drive to read/write. You will need to do this by hand, however, and you’ll need to re-do it every time you switch PCs.

With Fedora on a stick drive, no matter where you go or what PC you’re using, you’ll have your own Fedora desktop already set up just the way you want it. Fedora 9 is an excellent, modern Linux; if you enjoy using it, you’ll enjoy even more being able to use it on almost any PC at hand.

Fedora 9 now lets you create a bootable Linux distribution on a flash drive with persistence. In other words, you can not only boot any PC that will accept USB drive booting into Linux, you can even boot into your own personal desktop. Now, that can be useful.

Perhaps the easiest way to set up your own Fedora desktop on a stick is to use, believe it or not, liveusb-creator on Windows. This program gives you a straightforward GUI for creating Fedora desktop sticks. There is also a version of the program for Linux, but it’s still in beta.

Of course, you can also install the Fedora stick desktop with command-line instructions. I tried both ways, and while the Windows application is mindlessly simple, using the manual way on Linux isn’t going to task anyone with any Linux experience.

Either way you do it, you have the option of installing Fedora as a non-destructive upgrade, so if you already have files on a USB drive you can keep them while still turning the stick into a bootable drive. In practice, however, I found that I got better results by zapping the stick’s files and reformatting it. After all, it is just a USB drive. As far as I’m concerned, they’re meant for temporary storage.

I also found, although Red Hat staffers told me that you can deploy Fedora on USB sticks with as little as 64MB of storage, you really don’t want to do it with drives that hold less than 512MB. Officially, Fedora recommends that you use 1GB or larger USB drives.

The USB stick needs to be formatted in FAT-16 or -32 or the ext2 or ext3 filesystems. Most drives arrive preformatted in Windows’ FAT-32.

There’s a long list of tasks to keep in mind when creating a Fedora USB stick, including making a USB drive bootable and setting a master boot record. I ran into a problem that wasn’t covered though. I discovered that, for me at least, trying to create Fedora desktops on smaller USB drives or with older systems with USB 1.1 interfaces didn’t work. When I tried, the installation either failed or I ended up with a stick that would boot but ran as slowly as if it had one foot in a bear-trap. Once I moved to good-sized drives and PCs with USB 2.0 ports, creating the Fedora desktops went off without a hitch.

I also found that it was almost impossible to boot and run the stick-based Fedora on old PCs with USB 1.1 ports. On systems with 2.0 USB ports, however, everything went well. You should be aware though that, to quote the Fedora scripts page, “This may or may not work on your flash drive or your computer due to different BIOS settings and capabilities. I’ve tested several flash drives on several computers and the results were unexpected and surprising. Flash Drive A worked on Computer X but not on Computer Y. Flash Drive B didn’t work on Computer X but worked on Computer Y.” In my experience, using recent Lenovo, Dell, Gateway, and Hewlett-Packard PCs, the USB-stick-based version of Fedora ran flawlessly.

That said, you won’t mistake Fedora on USB for Fedora installed on a hard drive. The system is fast enough to be useful, but it’s not as fast as native Fedora on the same system. On the other hand, I found it to be much faster than using a live CD on the same PC. And, of course, you can save your settings and work on the USB stick.

You can also install additional programs on your portable desktop. To do this you simply use Fedora’s usual System -> Administration -> Add/Remove Programs from Fedora’s default GNOME 2.22 interface. Once you’ve installed them on your stick, you can use the new programs just as you would any other application. This really is a full, no-compromise version of Fedora. It just happens to live on a USB stick.

Once you’ve booted a system with it, you can also use all of the PC’s peripherals. To make full use of a system that normally boots Windows, you’ll want to be sure to install NTFS Config. With this program, you’ll be able to read and write to Windows systems’ native NTFS hard drives. Once installed, you’ll need to set up the drive configuration every time you’re working on a new Windows PC. It’s easy enough to do: pick NTFS Config from the System menu and set the hard drive to read/write. You will need to do this by hand, however, and you’ll need to re-do it every time you switch PCs.

With Fedora on a stick drive, no matter where you go or what PC you’re using, you’ll have your own Fedora desktop already set up just the way you want it. Fedora 9 is an excellent, modern Linux; if you enjoy using it, you’ll enjoy even more being able to use it on almost any PC at hand.

Mozilla is edging closer to releasing a new version of Firefox that could increase the use of open-source video software.

Firefox 3.1, the next major release due by early next year, will likely include support for a new HTML tag specifically for embedding video in Web pages. Firefox 3.1 will also support royalty-free video codec Ogg Theora.

Firefox developers at a summit this week in Whistler, British Columbia, said they’ve started working on native Theora support, and test builds of the browser incorporating the new feature are available.

The code committed so far is a work in progress, wrote Chris Double, a Mozilla engineer who has been handling the project, “but it’s a start towards using a common codec across all platforms and will improve as we get towards the 3.1 release.”

When the upgrade is finalized, Firefox users won’t have to download a plugin to play Theora content. Another cited advantage is that Web developers can just use a <video> tag to mark content, rather than needing JavaScript to launch a video.

Video on the Web these days is a jumble of different software formats and products, with major ones including Apple‘s QuickTime, Microsoft‘s Windows Media, Adobe‘s Flash and RealNetworks‘ RealPlayer multimedia players. The plugins are free. The companies make money by selling streaming servers and encoding software.

Some see that commercial interest as potentially harmful to the Internet, since content locked up in a particular format could become inaccessible due to a change in a vendor’s product development plans.

Videos in formats such as.AVI can be converted to Theora using VLC, an open-source streaming media server, video player and converter from the VideoLAN Project. Another open-source converter is ffmpeg2theora.

Firefox’s work will streamline the delivery of video to users, wrote a user by the name of J5 on his blog.

“That to me is freedom– to allow for those who prefer open formats the ability to deliver their content without any barriers between them and their end users,” J5 wrote.

Opera Software, which makes a browser by the same name, has also implemented the video HTML tag. The company said last month that it has released versions of its latest browser that support Ogg Theora for Windows, Linux and Mac OS X operating systems.

“It’s such an obvious improvement over the previous state of affairs of dealing with online video that it really makes you wonder why it took so long,” wrote Ben McIlwain, an IT consultant, on his blog. “We’re several years into the online video revolution now (led by such giants as YouTube), so it’s only fair that we finally get native browser support for videos.”

The moves by Mozilla and Opera can be seen as a strike against Microsoft, which dominates the browser market. Figures from Net Applications from last month show Internet Explorer with a 73 percent market share, compared to Firefox at 19 percent and Opera at.69 percent.

Ogg Theora isn’t supported in Internet Explorer 7. It is an older compression specification compared to Adobe’s Flash 9, which uses the latest H.264 technology and is used on prominent Web sites such as Google‘s YouTube.

However, the Wikimedia Commons is using Ogg Theora for video.

~GGG~