Apple TV review (2010)

By Joshua Topolsky posted Sep 29th 2010 12:55PM
You’ve been waiting, and it’s finally here: the Apple TV review. Months before Steve Jobs announced the new set top box at Apple’s annual fall event, we had been reporting on news that the company would strike out again into the TV market, offering a small, low-cost box that had more in common with the iPhone than the iMac. When those rumors came to fruition, we were presented with the completely revamped Apple TV — a tiny black puck of a device priced at a staggering $99, and centered around a handful of completely new ideas (for the folks in Cupertino at least) about getting content onto your TV screen.

It’s hard to believe that what we’re looking at is real — but we assure you, the picture above is in fact the PlayStation Phone you’ve long been waiting for. As we reported back in August, the device you see is headed into the market soon, likely boasting Android 3.0 (aka Gingerbread), along with a custom Sony Marketplace which will allow you to purchase and download games designed for the new platform. The device snapped up top (and in our gallery below) is sporting a 1GHz Qualcomm MSM8655 (a chip similar to the one found in the G2, but 200MHz faster), 512MB of RAM, 1GB of ROM, and the screen is in the range of 3.7 to 4.1 inches.

read more  http://bit.ly/dA6HhN

 

 

Using qshape :-

ftp://ftp.kfki.hu/pub/packages/mail/postfix/experimental/postfix-2.2-20050222-newdb-nonprod/auxiliary/qshape/qshape.pl

For example, in the output below we see the top 10 lines of the (mostly forged) sender domain distribution for captured spam in the “hold” queue:

$ qshape -s hold | head
                         T  5 10 20 40 80 160 320 640 1280 1280+
                 TOTAL 486  0  0  1  0  0   2   4  20   40   419
             yahoo.com  14  0  0  1  0  0   0   0   1    0    12
  extremepricecuts.net  13  0  0  0  0  0   0   0   2    0    11
        ms35.hinet.net  12  0  0  0  0  0   0   0   0    1    11
      winnersdaily.net  12  0  0  0  0  0   0   0   2    0    10
           hotmail.com  11  0  0  0  0  0   0   0   0    1    10
           worldnet.fr   6  0  0  0  0  0   0   0   0    0     6
        ms41.hinet.net   6  0  0  0  0  0   0   0   0    0     6
                osn.de   5  0  0  0  0  0   1   0   0    0     4

If one looks at the two queues separately, the incoming queue is empty or perhaps briefly has one or two messages, while the active queue holds more messages and for a somewhat longer time:

$ qshape incoming

                 T  5 10 20 40 80 160 320 640 1280 1280+
          TOTAL  0  0  0  0  0  0   0   0   0    0     0

$ qshape active

                 T  5 10 20 40 80 160 320 640 1280 1280+
          TOTAL  5  0  0  0  1  0   0   0   1    1     2
  meri.uwasa.fi  5  0  0  0  1  0   0   0   1    1     2

his is from a server where recipient validation is not yet available for some of the hosted domains. Dictionary attacks on the unvalidated domains result in bounce backscatter. The bounces dominate the queue, but with proper tuning they do not saturate the incoming or active queues. The high volume of deferred mail is not a direct cause for alarm.

$ qshape deferred | head

                         T  5 10 20 40 80 160 320 640 1280 1280+
                TOTAL 2234  4  2  5  9 31  57 108 201  464  1353
  heyhihellothere.com  207  0  0  1  1  6   6   8  25   68    92
  pleazerzoneprod.com  105  0  0  0  0  0   0   0   5   44    56
       groups.msn.com   63  2  1  2  4  4  14  14  14    8     0
    orion.toppoint.de   49  0  0  0  1  0   2   4   3   16    23
          kali.com.cn   46  0  0  0  0  1   0   2   6   12    25
        meri.uwasa.fi   44  0  0  0  0  1   0   2   8   11    22
    gjr.paknet.com.pk   43  1  0  0  1  1   3   3   6   12    16
 aristotle.algonet.se   41  0  0  0  0  0   1   2  11   12    15

Important commands :-

  • Print queue: postqueue -p
  • Delete all messages from the queue: postsuper -d ALL
  • Read a message: postcat -q <queue file id>
  • See what shape the queue is in: qshape

Release messages from hold

mailq | awk '{if($1 ~ /[A-F0-9]+!$/) {gsub(/!/, "", $1); print($1); system(sprintf("postsuper -H%s", $1)); } }'
postqueue -f

Requeue hold messages to force delivery

mailq | awk '{if($1 ~ /[A-F0-9]+!$/) {gsub(/!/, "", $1); print($1); system(sprintf("postsuper -H%s", $1)); } }'

Flush the queue

postqueue -f

Clean all MAILER-DAEMON error messages

Normal Messages

mailq | tail +2 | awk '{ if ($7 == "MAILER-DAEMON") print $1 } ' | postsuper -d -

for me mailq returns the message id with a trailing ! so I use:

mailq | awk '{ if ($7 == "MAILER-DAEMON") print substr ($1, 1, length($1)-1) } ' | postsuper -d -

Messages with errors

mailq | grep MAILER-DAEMON |  sed -e 's/!$//' | cut -d " " -f 1 | postsuper -d -

or

mailq | tail +2 | awk '{ if ($7 == "MAILER-DAEMON") print $1 } ' | sed -e 's/!$//' | postsuper -d -

If you want to delete messages with the ! sign on the end, use

mailq | tail +2 | awk '{ if ($7 == "MAILER-DAEMON") print $1 } '  | cut -d! -f 1 | postsuper -d -

courtesy :

http://maia.deec.uc.pt/Computers/Operating_Systems/Linux/Servers/Mail/Postfix/Postfix_Queue_Management/Queue_Management

http://www.postfix.org/DEBUG_README.html

To get rid of spam on your Qmail mail server:

  1. Make sure that all domains have the Mail to nonexistent user option set to Reject.This option is available since Parallels Plesk Panel 7.5.3 and can be changed for all the domains using group operations: select the domains, click Modify Selected, in the Preferences section select Switch on for the Mail to nonexistent user option and select the Reject value for it.
  2. Make sure that there are no untrusted IP addresses or networks in the white list.To do this, go to Home > Mail Server Settings > White List tab. To remove untrusted IP addresses or networks, select them in the list and click Remove Selected.
  3. Check how many messages there are in the Qmail queue with:# /var/qmail/bin/qmail-qstat

    messages in queue: 27645

    messages in queue but not yet preprocessed: 82

    If there are too many messages in the queue, try to find out where the spam is coming from. If the mail is being sent by an authorized user, but not from a PHP script, you can find out which user sent most of the messages with the following command:

    # cat /usr/local/psa/var/log/maillog |grep -I smtp_auth |grep -I user |awk '{print $11}' |sort |uniq -c |sort -n

    Note that the SMTP authorization option should be enabled on the server to see these records. The path to maillog may be different depending the OS you use.

  4. Use the qmail-qread utility to read the messages headers:# /var/qmail/bin/qmail-qread

    18 Jul 2005 15:03:07 GMT #2996948 9073 <user@domain.com> bouncing

    done remote user1@domain1.com

    done remote user2@domain2.com

    done remote user3@domain3.com

    ….

    The qmail-qread utility shows messages’ senders and recipients. If a message has too many recipients, then it is most probably spam.

  5. Try to find the message in the queue by it’s ID (for example, the message ID is #1234567):# find /var/qmail/queue/mess/ -name 1234567
  6. Look into the message and find the first from the end Received line. It is where the message was initially sent from.
    • If you find something like:Received: (qmail 19514 invoked by uid 12345); 10 Sep 2008 17:48:22 +0700

      it means that this message was sent via a CGI script by user with UID 12345. Use this UID to find a corresponding domain:

      # grep 12345 /etc/passwd

    • Received lines like:Received: (qmail 19622 invoked from network); 10 Sep 2008 17:52:36 +0700

      Received: from external_domain.com (192.168.0.1)

      mean that the message was accepted for delivery via SMTP and the sender is an authorized mail user.

    • If Received line contains an UID of an apache user (for example invoked by uid 48), it means that the spam was sent via an PHP script. In this case you can try to find the spammer using information from the spam e-mails (from/to addresses, subjects, etc). But usually to find the spam source is very hard in this case. If you are sure that some script is sending spam at the current moment (the queue grows very fast), you can use this little script to find out what PHP scripts are running in real-time:# lsof +r 1 -p `ps axww | grep httpd | grep -v grep | awk ‘ { if(!str) { str=$1 } else { str=str”,”$1}}END{print str}’` | grep vhosts | grep php

      To try to find out from what folder the PHP script that sends mail was run, create /var/qmail/bin/sendmail-wrapper script with the following content:

      #!/bin/sh

      (echo X-Additional-Header: $PWD ;cat) | tee -a /var/tmp/mail.send|/var/qmail/bin/sendmail-qmail “$@”

      Note, the paths can slightly differ depending on your OS and Parallels Plesk Panel version.

      Create a log file /var/tmp/mail.send and grant it a+rw rights, make the wrapper executable, rename old sendmail and link it to the new wrapper:

      # touch /var/tmp/mail.send

      # chmod a+rw /var/tmp/mail.send

      # chmod a+x /var/qmail/bin/sendmail-wrapper

      # mv /var/qmail/bin/sendmail /var/qmail/bin/sendmail-qmail

      # ln -s /var/qmail/bin/sendmail-wrapper /var/qmail/bin/sendmail

      Wait for about an hour and revert sendmail back:

      # rm -f /var/qmail/bin/sendmail

      # ln -s /var/qmail/bin/sendmail-qmail /var/qmail/bin/sendmail

      Examine the /var/tmp/mail.send file. There should be lines starting with X-Additional-Header pointing out to domains’ folders where the script that sends the mail is located.

      You can see all the folders where mail PHP scripts were run from with the following command:

      # grep X-Additional /var/tmp/mail.send | grep `cat /etc/psa/psa.conf | grep HTTPD_VHOSTS_D | sed -e ‘s/HTTPD_VHOSTS_D//’ `